# A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
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Gold Snatchers (1973) Directed by: Kim Lung

Chen Sing out of prison aggressively and intensely fights with a ton of his brother's (Lung Fei) henchmen and tries to convert the criminal brother to the good side. If anything a reference example of Chen Sing's strengths as a rough, hard hitting fighter, the parade of fights is highly enjoyable and when by the end taking on dogs as well, you know Gold Snatchers is steering you into fun territory (despite in reality being rather melodramatic).

Gone With The Cloud (1974) Directed by: Steven Lau

In her debut Outside The Window (1973), Brigitte Lin played a schoolgirl engaged in forbidden love with her teacher. The second on-screen appearance in Gone With The Cloud puts her next to someone similarly aged but it's still a romance, between Lee Chung-Liang (Lin) and Shanming (Gu Ming-Lun), not approved by each respective family. Standing on traditions and notions of face, these are choices that leads to ache rather than bright, secure futures. Characters such as Chung-Liang's sister Di Di (the incredibly beautiful Tong Bo-Wan), who is taking care of the family all by herself, are among the ones taking a hard beating after taking part in this decision...

One tradition Gone With The Cloud also stands on is the tools of the trade of the Taiwan melodrama and it's something that strikes back at Steven Lau's film to a degree. Appearing quite calculated in its usage of repetitive sound cues to represent a dramatic beat and theme songs to speak of the emotion on-screen, in fact Lau has an interesting tragedy to speak of. Certainly showing more confidence when creating more cinematic flourishes the darker the drama becomes, Lau easily slips into (and often) the over the top gear as well. Sometimes the moments visually are suitably subtle but blasting on the audio we still get rampant voice over and more songs (accompanied by a montage at times too). Narrative-wise it takes a while to get past the talky nature, Brigitte Lin's nasty and mean character and the fact that she seems to change her opinion of Shanming fast but for somewhat seasoned viewers of the genre, Gone With The Cloud offer some compelling (darker) stretches of film, albeit more sporadic than one would like. Director Lau co-stars as Chung-Liang's brother in a sub-plot that largely feels like filler. Also with Guan Shan (The Tournament).

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The Good, The Bad & The Bandit (1991) Directed by: Lam Ji-Yan

After losing his memory, gangster Lau Chia Tin (Ray Lui) begins to explore what went wrong and the possibility that his boss (Wong Yung) betrayed him. He crosses paths with and teams up with a low ranked triad (Simon Yam) that is in debt but he might be able to clear it if he gives Lau to his former employers...

There's much of The Good, The & The Bandit that is average but also satisfying in a comforting way. Clearly not shot on a single set but rather in cramped apartments and outside, the various fisticuffs and shoot outs are never particularly noteworthy or exciting, it's all only mildly funny or brutal and leading charisma is clearly not put forth by Ray Lui. But it's from such a correct era for me personally where standards, even below standards as long as a wide mix is on display, is very much sufficient. Simon Yam in his 40th movie that year probably has quite a bit of fun though and his entrance on a motorbike of course sets up a later action scene that is the best this mild experience has to offer. Some brutality and a crudely inserted sex scene later, a lot of barely standard familiarity saves The Good, The Bad & The Bandit believe it or not and it's over as well as forgotten quick. Also appearing is Michael Chan, playing a cop in a rare occurrence.

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The Good, The Bad & The Beauty (1988) Directed by: Frankie Chan

Frankie Chan vehicle that shows sparks of promise in the beginning but derails as we move along. This action-comedy has no shame in the way it changes moods in a heartbeat and that combination is acceptable for a while since the action, primarily gunplay and stunts, is of pretty decent caliber. Strangely enough, Frankie seems to have used all his ammo quickly and the rest of the film gives us even less fun comedy and worse action, including the finale. The potential for an entertaining slice of 1980s action distraction was there but not for a full feature. Frankie has definitely done better, especially action-wise. Cherie Chung brings a nice, playful presence though but the film is still a chore to get through. Also starring Kent Cheng and Bill Tung.

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Goodbye Captain (1998) Directed by: Chun Lok

It looks a little tired as it's from a production year not notable for many genre highlights but this mostly Mainland set actioner featuring Yu Rong-Guang fleeing the world of triads to reconcile with his son is a bit of a sleeper hit on the senses. Granted, it's very low-budget and its drama isn't prime or suited for prime time but within the genre framework, director Chun Lok makes his dips into seriousness surprisingly worthwhile. Dealing with how lies affects your child, you do become even more surprised that it actually rings true of poignancy towards the end. But Goodbye Captain is mostly about adhering to its preferred movie type and it almost seems to blow its wad early with some impressive mayhem. Stock bad guys (main one being Ken Tong, sporting an eye patch that "creatively" varies throughout) and some slightly sluggish choreography is very evident subsequently. However grit and flow there continues to be plentiful of, especially in the warehouse finale. Also with Diana Pang, Cheung Kwok-Keung, Takajo Fujimi and a short appearance by William Ho (who is hilariously dubbed on the Mandarin version).

Goodbye Darling (1987) Directed by: Raymond Wong

Many should be asking themselves when faced with Goodbye Darling: how could Raymond Wong bag Cherie Chung as his wife in the film?! Aside from being the creative force of course, the character is probably just a nice guy but he's about let her slip from his gentle grip. All due to a misunderstanding that makes him believe he has terminal breast cancer and he sets out to find a suitable husband to take over after he's gone. The choice is Joe (Mark Cheng)...

Wong's recipe for the film seems to be breakneck speed and going as low brow as possible. Pratfalls, AIDS jokes, gay jokes, transvestite jokes, more gay jokes and the male Hong Kong populous is portrayed as having a great, big hard on for Cherie Chung. This is the politically incorrect world as interpreted by Wong but it's a very funny one. It's simple but it's rapid in a sense, creating comedic effects of the guilty pleasure kind. Hong Kong cinema reveled in this silliness but it's rare when it's actually delightful to boot. More often than not, you sigh along with it. Not that any of those types of comedic executions are hard to get through though.

Raymond does seem to go some heartwarming routes also but never ventures too far into it and never showcases that he's capable either. So it's not an underrated pre-cursor to Always On My Mind but it's a fine, funny addition to Cinema City's catalogue. Co-starring John Shum.

Goodbye Hero (1990) Directed by: Jacob Cheung

A welcome glimpse into the lowly life of a Hong Kong stuntman, Goodbye Hero stars Derek Yee as the veteran Tony who handles both a friend (Chin Siu-Ho) who's been paralyzed from the profession and a cocky, new kid on the block (David Wu). Feeling shame for not having moved on, Tony is at a transition where he's either going to pass on his knowledge or die practicing it...

An ace director directing an ace director, Jacob Cheung (Cageman, Battle Of Wits) gets solid presence out of Derek Yee (who had directed The Lunatics and People's Hero by this point), possessing the shell of a usually reserved character well. The glimpses into the mentioned shame he feels, having not upgraded himself to even action director is quietly communicated and felt. During this heyday of action filmmaking, limits were pushed without much acknowledgements at least in terms of money coming to these brave men and women. The film is at his best when highlighting these issues and the behind the scenes aspects. Having to create more extreme stunts, the risk for the ACTUAL filmmakers here is that they have to do the same for sake of drama. This they pull off but when Cheung directs his attention to the off-set narrative involving David Wu and Vivian Chow's characters, the film doesn't engage as much and would've benefited from even more focus on Yee and supporting player Chin Siu-Ho. Ching Siu-Tung plays a director while Lam Ching-Ying, Petrina Fung and Cora Miao also appear. The story scenario would later be somewhat echoed by Yee when he directed Full Throttle that also co-starred David Wu.

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Goodbye My Friend (19??) Directed by: Hoh Lin Chow

Listed as a 1988 production if you look it up at Hong Kong Movie Database, while watching this Chow Yun-Fat vehicle it's very evident that it was shot at least 8-9 years prior. Unearthed and released (perhaps for the first time ever?) after Chow became a megastar all over Asia, Goodbye My Friend is a perfect example of cashing in, regardless of quality. With a horrendously poor Cantonese dub (that does feature Chow), the movie comes off as a bad story restructured in the post dubbing into another bad story. One even wonders if Cantonese should be the intended language. Still, these geeky details aren't worth worrying about as Goodbye My Friend is a turkey from the initial stepping stones into a screen acting career for Chow Yun-Fat.

A standard gangster story set in 1940s Thailand involving revenge also holds some bizarre subplot about a blood sect collaborating with the Japanese so naturally, the Chinese must unite to bring them down. Featuring little to care for and characters that no one possibly can figure out what they're doing and who they are, the hokey aspect that runs through the production does create some ludicrous moments that transforms the film into a minor guilty pleasure. The gore does draw attention to itself and the action is not only highly incompetent but at times undercranked to wonderfully bizarre levels. And fact of the matter is, the film is easy to get through. Kenneth Tsang also appears briefly.

Xenon was responsible for a subtitled VHS release under the title Shanghai Killers, utilizing a still from City War for its cover. A wise decision since Chow Yun-Fat had better hair in that film.

Goodbye My Love (1986) Directed by: Frankie Chan

A Frankie Chan concoction we've seen within his director filmography and he never seemed to get he has no business making anything but action and violence as those are the imprints he leaves on his audience. When hamming it up as a thief in the long run being a valuable support for Joan Chen's character after she gets cancer, Chan makes himself and Goodbye My Love a bland romantic comedy but makes us sit up through gritty gunplay, stunts and a dark (albeit undeserved ending). He had his filmmaking path under his nose and he didn't even know it. Also with Wu Fung and Lau Chi-Wing. Also known as Goodbye My Hero and Everlasting Love.

The Goofy Gang (1987) Directed by: Stanley Fung

Derek Yee and friends take out their anger as low paid workers at a country club onto wealthy Harry Tse (Stanley Fung). Rather inexperienced and clumsy kidnappers, Harry doesn't fear for his life at all but when no one wants to pay ransom money for him, a personal betrayal leads to him working with his kidnappers to exact a little revenge...

A rather flimsy start or rather quick leads to rather quick decisions by Derek Yee to host the kidnapping plan. ALMOST a valid argument for these irrational characters, the lightness that follows in the trail of the kidnapping scenario is very fun to follow and in the background Stanley Fung injects some not so overbearing themes of the hard workers vs. the rich, pre-conceived notions about each other etc. Fung himself is very good as the kidnapping victim who's got the situation under control but it's when the plot turns, a quite grave tedium sets in. Simply put, Fung doesn't create interest for the entire two halves of the flick and his intent to get even more somber clashes with the prior movie in a bad way. A fun cast, 80s atmosphere, the dependable D & B gets you only so far sometimes. Also appearing is May Lo as Yee's love interest, Joyze Godenzi as the cop, Ronald Wong, Robert Mak, Stuart Ong with cameos by John Sham and Richard Ng.

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